ASSET, DACA and Undocumented Students Applying for Institutional Aid

We recommend that ASSET, DACA, or undocumented students check with their prospective institution for further guidance. Each college/university manage funds differently and have different requirements for ASSET and/or DACA students. 



QUESTION: 
What steps must DACA and/or ASSET students complete in order to be considered for institutional financial aid at your college?

 

ANSWER:
1. Students are encouraged to check with their prospective institution for scholarship eligibility.
2. Students must be fully admitted.
3. Colleges or universities may require that a FAFSA be filed in order to be considered for institutional aid. 
 


QUESTION:
What support services and resources does your institution provide to undocumented students?

ANSWER:
Undocumented students are provided the same level/type of services and resources as any other student.


QUESTION:
Where do I find more information about Colorado in-state tuition eligibility for undocumented students?

 


Frequently Asked Questions


QUESTION:
Are there any risks to undocumented students associated with completing the FAFSA?

ANSWER:
No – Unless a student is involved in a pending criminal investigation, the information submitted on the FAFSA will not be used for any sort of prosecution, per an agreement between the federal Department of Education (ED), the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and the Social Security Administration. The information on the FAFSA is only used to verify accuracy with SSA. When there is a mismatch between the name and SSN, the FAFSA is rejected and an Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is not calculated by the central processor, but the information is still provided to the colleges the student listed. The colleges may then use the FAFSA data and follow up with the students to calculate an EFC.


QUESTION:
If undocumented students have a SSN through DACA (Defered Action for Childhood Arrivals), should they use that SSN on the FAFSA?

ANSWER: 
Yes – if students have a SSN, they should use it on the FAFSA. For those who have a SSN through DACA, the verification with SSA will confirm that they are ineligible for federal student aid. Their FAFSA will be rejected, but processed and the information will be sent to the colleges included on the form.


QUESTION: 
On the FAFSA, how do I answer the question that reads, “Are you a U.S. citizen?”
 

ANSWER:
DACA and/or ASSET students must answer that question by selecting the option “No, I am not a citizen or eligible
non-citizen.”


QUESTION:
If undocumented students use the online FAFSA system and they have a SSN through DACA, are they able to apply for an FSA ID and use it to sign the FAFSA electronically?

 

ANSWER:
Yes - Undocumented student with a DACA SSN can apply for a FSA ID and sign the FAFSA electronically.

Undocumented students without DACA will not be able to apply for a FSA ID but should still complete the FAFSA online and use the printed signature page to sign the form.


QUESTION:
If undocumented students do not have a SSN, how should they fill in the SSN field for the online FAFSA? 

ANSWER:
Use 001-01-0001 in place of the SSN for all students who do not have a SSN. Verification with SSA will show a mismatch, the FAFSA will be rejected, but processed and the information will be sent to the colleges included on the form.


QUESTION:
When undocumented students submit a FAFSA that clearly indicates they are ineligible for federal student aid, will the centralized FAFSA processing system calculate an Expected Family Contribution for them?

ANSWER: 
No – When the SSA verification shows a mismatch, or confirms that a student with a DACA SSN is ineligible for federal student aid, an EFC is not calculated by the central processor. The FAFSA is rejected, but processed and the information will be sent to the colleges included on the form. Colleges will then be able to calculate an EFC.


QUESTION:
If undocumented students mistakenly indicate they are U.S. Citizens or Lawful Permanent Residents on the FAFSA, what steps should be taken to limit the impact on their future opportunities to pursue citizenship?

ANSWER:
No follow up should be necessary – Per the agreement between ED and DHS, FAFSA information cannot be used to prosecute students and DHS cannot access FAFSA information, unless the student is involved in an ongoing criminal investigation or prosecution.